We Are the White Mountains of New Hampshire
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We Are the White Mountains of New Hampshire

This article is a comprehensive overview of the White Mountains that are found between New York and Boston, and cover about one-fourth of the northern part of the state of New Hampshire, as well as a small section of western Maine. The home of eight New Hampshire State Parks, the White Mountain National Forest, the 6,288 foot tall Mount Washington, the highest elevation point in the Northeastern United States, the Presidential Mountain Range that is named after US Presidents Franklin Pierce, James Monroe, Dwight Eisenhower, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, John Quincy Adams, and James Madison, as well as several other mountain ranges, the Dry River Wilderness, the Pemigewasset Wilderness Area, the Sandwich Range Wilderness, and at least forty famous waterfalls at locations known as the Crystal Cascades, the Beaver Brook Cascades, the Falling Waters Trail, the Sabbaday Falls, the Norway Rapids, the Zealand Falls, the Gordon Falls, and the Diana Baths on Lucy Brook, the White Mountains, New England's most rugged mountains, are very popular tourist destinations.

White Mountains:

     Found between New York and Boston, and covering about one-fourth of the northern part of the state of New Hampshire, as well as a small section of western Maine, New England's most rugged mountains are very popular tourist destinations.

     The White Mountains are home to eight New Hampshire State Parks, the White Mountain National Forest, the Pemigewasset Wilderness Area, the Sandwich Range Wilderness, the Dry River Wilderness, the 6,288 foot tall Mount Washington, the highest elevation point in the Northeastern United States, the Presidential Mountain Range that is named after US Presidents Franklin Pierce, James Monroe, Dwight Eisenhower, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, John Quincy Adams, and James Madison, as well as several other mountain ranges, the Dry River Wilderness, and at least forty famous waterfalls at locations known as the Crystal Cascades, the Beaver Brook Cascades, the Falling Waters Trail, the Sabbaday Falls, the Norway Rapids, the Zealand Falls, the Gordon Falls, and the Diana Baths on Lucy Brook.

     Known for their alpine hiker huts, and crossed by the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, the Sandwich Mountain Range, the Dartmouth Mountain Range, the Carter-Moriah Mountain Range, the Bond Mountain Range, the Hancock Mountain Range, the Franconia Mountain Range, the Pilot Mountain Range, the Mahoosuc Mountain Range, the Pliny Mountain Range, the Twin Mountain Range, the Willey Mountain Range, the Baldface-Royce Mountain Range, and the Cannon-Kinsman Mountain Range are also part of the White Mountains.

White Mountain National Forest:

     Containing 1,200 miles of hiking trails, and many popular ski areas on Loon Mountain, Bear Peak, Attitash, the Tuckerman Ravine, Beaver Brook, Greeley Pond, Lafayette, Lincoln Woods, Zealand Valley, and more the White Mountain National Forest is one of the most frequently visited National sites in the United States.

Dry River Wilderness:

     Found in the Presidential Mountains from Crawford Notch to the slopes south of Mount Washington's summit, and known as the core of the Presidential Mountain Range, the 27,606 acre Dry River Wilderness possesses mainly Spruce-Fir vegetation, steep slopes, high ridgelines, Northern hardwood forests, 43 miles of hiking trails, including the very popular with backcountry hikers, Dry River Trail that provides access to the Southern Presidential Mountains, and only alpine-adaptable plants in its northernmost section. 

Pemigewasset Wilderness Area:

     Located in Grafton County, near the town of Lincoln, the 45,000 acre Pemigewasset Wilderness Area is found in the White Mountain National Forest and possesses the Hancock, Twin, Bond, Zealand, and Franconia Mountain Ranges but not their summits or the trail along them.  The Pemigewasset Wilderness is an extremely popular recreational area and has a very extensive cross-country skiing and hiking trail network.  The Pemigewasset Wilderness also provides the East and West Lobes, two horse-shoe shaped low, wet river valleys with high mountain ridges.

     The boundary wall of the Eastern Lobe of the Pemigewasset Wilderness Area is created by the Bond, Twin, and Franconia Mountain Ranges, with the main ridge of the area traveling from Mount Guyot to Mount Zealand and Zealand Cliff Peak, before ending at Zeacliff, overlooking Zealand Notch.  The ridge then runs along the Twinway Trail and the Ethan Pond Trail, to Mount Lowell, through Carrigain Notch and Vose Spur, to the summit of Mount Carrigain, where it crosses the famous The Captain crag, and the summit of Mount Hancock, before falling to the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River, Mount Bondcliff, and Mount Hitchcock.

     Surrounded by the Twin, Bond, and Franconia Mountain Ranges the Western Lobe of the main ridge of the Pemigewasset Wilderness Area runs near the Lincoln Woods Trailhead, across Potash Knob, Whaleback Mountain, and Mount Flume where it reaches the Franconia Ridge, then crosses Mount Liberty, Little Haystack Mountain, Mount Lincoln, Mount Lafayette, and Mount Garfield, where it becomes known as the Garfield Ridge, then travels on to Galehead Mountain, South Twin Mountain, and Mount Guyot.  The Western Lobe also provides the Owl's Head Mountain and the Lincoln Brook Valley.

Sandwich Range Wilderness:

     Containing rugged valleys, long ridgelines, high mountain passes, glacial cirques, boulder-covered streams, Northern hardwood trees, dense Spruce-Fir vegetation, Black Mountain Pond, Flat Mountain Pond, the steep cliffs of Square Ledge, and about 57 miles of hiking trails the 35,306 acre Sandwich Range Wilderness is located in the southeastern corner of the White Mountains.

Cannon Mountain:

     Standing approximately 4,080 feet tall Cannon Mountain is best known for its ice climbing on Cannon Cliff, the largest vertical rock face in the Northeast at about 1,000 feet tall and one mile long, as well as at Omega and The Black Dike, rock climbing opportunities at Moby Grape and the Whitney-Gilman Ridge, and skiing at the Cannon Mountain Ski Area in the Franconia Notch State Park that features 165 acres of skiing, nine ski lifts, the most vertical ski area in the state of New Hampshire, the only aerial tram in the Granite State, the Brookside Learning Center, a Ski and Snowboarding School, and the Peabody Base Lodge.

Mount Adams:

     Known as a hikers paradise Mount Adams is the second highest peak in the Northeastern United States at 5,774 feet tall.  Mount Adams is located in the uninhabited Low and Burbank's Grant township of Coos County on Durand Ridge and King Ravine, as well as in the Thompson and Meserve's Purchase township.  Mount Adams contains the two smaller peaks known as Mount Sam Adams and Mount Quincy Adams, as well as Mount Abigail Adams and Adams 5.  Established in the northern Presidential Mountain Range Mount Adams provides the enormous glacial ravine known as the Great Gulf that is the largest ravine in the White Mountains, the Nowell Ridge and its famous waterfalls, the Jefferson Ravine, the Osgood Ridge, Spaulding Lake, the Gulfside Trail, the Madison Trail, the Wamsutta Trail, the Chandler Brook Trail, the Gulf Trail, the Spinx Trail, the Six Husbands Trail, the popular Valley Way Trail, the panoramic Airline Trail, the rugged King Ravine Trail, the Lowe's Path Trail, the Star's Lake Trail, the Randolph East Trail, the Lowe's Store Trail, and a section of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

Mount Clay/Mount Reagan:

     Sitting on the northern ridge that joins Mount Jefferson and Mount Washington together at 5,533 feet tall Mount Clay/Mount Reagan can be located in the Thompson and Meserve's Purchase and is best approached by the Gulfside Trail and the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, as well as by the Mount Clay Loop Trail and the Jewell Trail.  Mount Clay/Mount Reagan, as the mountain is now referred to by the New Hamshire State Legislature, features cliffs that drop into the Great Gulf, the largest glacial cirque in the White Mountains, and possesses panoramic views of the Ammonoosuc Ravine as well as the Franconia Mountain Range.

Mount Davis:

     Found along Montalban Ridge in Coos County, New Hampshire's largest County, that also contains the state's northern panhandle, Mount Davis is a very popular, but extremely rugged, hiking area that was named for the famous Davis Family of Massachusetts who have been highly influential in National politics for the Whig Party, the Federalist Party, and the Republican Party for more than 220 years from the adoption of the Constitution of the United States, to candidates for the United States Senate, and a slew of other public offices as well.

Mount Eisenhower:

     Standing approximately 4,780 feet tall, and inaccessible by roads, Mount Eisenhower provides panoramic views of New Hampshire's mountains and is crossed by the Appalachian National Scenic Trail along the Crawford Path near the mountain's summit.  Other trails that lead to the top of Mount Eisenhower include the Edmands Path, the Eisenhower Loop Trail, the Ammonoosuc Ravine Trail, and several paths leading off US Route 302 on the southwest side of the mountain as well as from the Mount Clinton Road parking lot.

Mount Franklin:

     The 5,003 foot tall Mount Franklin is found northwest of the Dry River Wilderness of the White Mountain National Forest, from Crawford Notch to the summit of Mount Washington, between Mount Monroe and Mount Eisenhower in the Southern Presidential Mountains and is traveled by the rugged Dry River Wilderness Trail that cuts through the panoramic backcountry of the mountain.

Mount Isolation:

     Standing approximately 4,004 feet tall, and found in Pinkham Notch in Jackson, in the southern section of the Presidential Mountain Range, hiking to the summit of the very remote Mount Isolation requires a lengthy excursion along the Rocky Branch Trail, the Isolation Trail, the Davis Path, the Glen Boulder Trail, and over several hard to cross streams, or bushwhacking through deep Winter snows.

Mount Jackson:

     Found in the Southern Presidential Mountains the 4,052 foot tall Mount Jackson sits on the western side of the Dry River Wilderness between Mount Pierce and Mount Webster, east of Crawford Notch, with the Appalachian National Scenic Trail crossing its summit.  Mount Jackson can be easily accessed by the Webster Jackson Trail and the Webster Cliff Trail.  The mountain also provides the Elephant Head Spur ledge, the Gates of Crawford Notch, and Bugle Cliff.

Mount Jefferson:

     The third highest peak in the Northeastern United States, at 5,712 feet tall, Mount Jefferson possesses two distinct ridges known as Castle Ridge, and the extremely steep and rugged Ridge of the Caps, as well as Castle Ravine, Jefferson Ravine, a portion of the Great Gulf, a section of the Six Husbands Trail, the Gulfside Trail, the large alpine sedge known as the Monticello Lawn, and a part of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail that make the mountain a very popular hiking destination.  Mount Jefferson provides the highest elevated public highway in New Hampshire, the 3,009 foot tall Jefferson Notch, and therefore, the easiest to ascend mountain in the Presidential Range.  Mount Jefferson also has a summit, composed of three small peaklets arranged in a triangular shape, that provides arguably the most panoramic views in the Presidential Range.

Mount Madison:

     Located near Gorham, and standing 5,637 feet tall, Mount Madison is the northernmost mountain in the Presidential Range.  Mount Madison is wellknown for its many trails including the Valley Way Trail from the Appalachia Trailhead to the Madison Spring Hut, that is found on the location of the first High Huts of the White Mountains System site, above Madison Gulf's sheer walls.  Other popular trails perched on Mount Madison include the Watson Path, the Airline Cutoff Trail, the Airline Trail along the crest of Durant Ridge, the Gulfside Trail, the Osgood Trail, the Star Lake Trail, and a portion of the Applachian National Scenic Trail.

Mount Monroe:

     Listed at 5,372 feet tall Mount Monroe is the fourth highest peak in the Presidential Range and possesses the two alpine Lakes of the Clouds ponds, found between Mount Monroe and Mount Washington, that create the Ammonoosuc River, as well as the Lakes of the Clouds Hut, the most popular, largest, and highest hiker's hut in the High Huts of the White Mountains System, that can be easily accessed by the Mount Washington Cog Railway.  Mount Monroe also features the Robbin's Cinquefoil, a small yellow flower, that is only indigenous to the peak of the mountain.  The Ammonoosuc Ravine Trail, and a section of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, lead to the summit of Mount Monroe.

Mount Pierce:

     Standing 4,310 feet tall Mount Pierce was named for the only US President born in New Hampshire.  Found in Carroll, and originally known as Mount Clinton, the most popular trail to the mountain's summit primarily follows the Crawford Path, America's oldest continually used hiking trail.  Other trails contained on Mount Pierce include the Webster Cliff Trail, the Crawford Connector Trail, the Eisenhower Loop Trail, the Mizpah Cutoff, Mount Clinton Road, and a portion of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail.  Mount Pierce also features the panoramic Gibbs Cascades, the Gibbs Falls, and the Willey House Historical Site of Crawford Notch in the Crawford Notch State Park.

Mount Washington:

     Found in the Presidential Range of the White Mountains, in Sargent's Purchase in Coos County, Mount Washington is almost entirely located in the White Mountain National Forest.

     Mount Washington's claim to fame is its dangerous and erratic weather that has included the fastest gust of wind on Earth ever measured and clocked at 231 miles per hour on April 12, 1934, an average of 102 inches of rainfall each year, a record high of 130 degrees, and an average of 310 inches of snow annualy.

     The mountain's summit contains the Mount Washington State Park, and the Mount Washington Observatory and Museum, as well as the historic Tip Top House hostelry and museum with exhibits about the mountain's history.  Mount Washington's summit can be accessed by the Crawford Notch Trail, the Pinkham Notch Trail, the Mount Washington Cog Railway, the Mount Washington Auto Road, and the Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

     Mount Washington features Great Gulch on its southern side, the largest glacial amphitheatre-like valley head in the White Mountains, Chandler Ridge that contains the Mount Washington Auto Road, the Alpine Gardens Plateau, Huntington Ravine that is wellknown for its ice and rock climbing opportunities, Tuckerman Ravine that is New England's most popular Spring backcountry skiing location, and is famous for its Memorial Day skiing events, and more than one hundred avalanches a year, the Bigelow Lawn Plateau, the Boott Spur that is considered a secondary summit of Mount Washington, the Montalban Ridge, Crawford Notch and its steep narrow gorge of the Saco River, Oakes Gulf on the mountain's southern slope, glider flying lessons, the Lakes of the Clouds Appalachian National Scenic Trail Hut that is the Trail's largest, highest in elevation in the White Mountains, and most popular hut for Thru-Hikers, the 7.6 mile Road Race Up Mount Washington, the Mount Washington Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb, the Newton's Revenge Bicycle Race, and the MINI Coopers On Top Auto Show.

Mount Webster:

     The 3,911 foot tall Mount Webster, located on the western slope of the Dry River Wilderness near North Conway, is the southwesternmost mountain in the Presidential Mountain Range.  Mount Webster also has the Appalachian National Scenic Trail crossing its summit and features the Elephant Head Spur Trail, the Webster Cliff Trail, and the Webster-Jackson Trail.

Galehead Mountain:

     The wooded summit of the 4,024 foot tall Galehead Mountain in Grafton County can be accessed by the Frost Trail, and the Gale River Trail, with a portion of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail crossing the mountain's northern face just below its summit.  Galehead Mountain also contains the Galehead Hut, the fourth highest hut of the High Huts of the White Mountains System, that is located between Galehead Mountain and South Twin Mountain.

Loon Mountain:

     Celebrated for its Loon Mountain Ski Resort, that annually hosts more skiers than any other Granite State ski area with its dozen or more ski lifts, 53 ski trails, 324 acres, Ripshaw, Upper Twitcher, Lower Twitcher, and Jobber Expert-rated slopes, Octogan Lodge, Springboard Recreational Racing site known as Race City, and Lower Rum Runner Recreational Ski Area, as well as the New Hampshire Highland Games, the 3,065 foot tall Loon Mountain is found in Lincoln in the White Mountain National Forest.

Mount Avalon:

     Featuring perhaps the most scenic view of the Southern Presidential Mountain Range, as well as the Willey Mountain Range, the 3,399 foot tall Mount Avalon is located in Grafton County near Bretton Woods and North Conway.  The mountain's Avalon Trail is an easily accessible trail that leads to an extremely steep climb to it's summit.  Mount Avalon also provides several stream crossings and popular waterfalls.

Mount Bond:

     Located in the center of the Pemigewasset Wilderness Area the remote 4,698 foot tall Mount Bond is the southernmost extension of the Twin Mountain Range.  Mount Bond contains two subpeaks, known as Bondcliff and West Bond, and is considered one of the crown jewels of the White Mountain National Forest.  Several trails lead up Mount Bond including the Twinway Trail, the Zealand Trail, the Bondcliff Trail, the Wilderness Trail, the Franconia Brook Trail, the Gale River Trail, and the North Twin Trail.  Mount Bond also provides easy access to the Zealand Falls Hut, a popular family destination in the High Huts of the White Mountains System that overlooks the 25 foot tall Zealand Falls near the town of Bethlehem.

Mount Bondcliff:

     Famous for its remotely isolated hiking trails including the Bondcliff Trail, the Wilderness Trail, and the Lincoln Woods Trail, the 4,265 foot tall Mount Bondcliff is found north of the Kancamagus Scenic Byway at the Lincoln Woods Visitor's Center.  Mount Bondcliff also possesses an extensive boulder field and panoramic scenes that are considered some of the best in the White Mountain National Forest.

Mount Cabot:

     The highest peak of the Pilot Mountain Range at 4,167 feet tall Mount Cabot is relatively isolated from the remainder of the White Mountains by the Israel River Valley.  Mount Cabot is the northernmost Four-Thousand Footer of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail found in New Hampshire and is regarded as one of New England's Fifty Finest Topographically Prominent Peaks.  Located in the White Mountain National Forest Mount Cabot can be accessed by the Mount Cabot Trail, the Unknown Pond Trail, the Kilkenny Ridge Trail, the Bunnell Notch Trail, the York Pond Trail, and Mill Brook Road.  Mount Cabot also features the Berlin Fish Hatchery that provides exhibits on hatching and raising fish in New Hampshire.

Mount Carrigain:

     Found on the south side of the Pemigewasset Wilderness Area, between Crawford Notch and Franconia Notch, the 4,700 foot tall, thickly wooded, distinctly hump-shaped Mount Carrigain possesses the Vose Spur subpeak, as well as it's densely wooded summit and talus field of broken rock fragments, that is bushwhacked from the Carrigain Notch Trail.  Mount Carrigain is accessed from the Signal Ridge Trail off the Sawyer River Road, the Desolation Trail, and the Carrigain Notch Trail.  Mount Carrigain provides panoramic views of 43 of New Hampshire's other Four-Thousand Footers and is the eighth largest Reduced Spire Measure in the Northeastern United States. 

Mount Flume:

     Overlooking Franconia Notch Mount Flume is the shortest and southernmost of the Franconia Mountains.  Mount Flume may be accessed from the Osseo Trail, the Franconia Ridge Trail, and the extremely steep, and almost constantly wet, Flume Slide Trail.

Mount Garfield:

     With its summit crossed by the Appalachian National Scenic Trail the 4,495 foot tall Mount Garfield is found in Grafton County, northeast of the Franconia Ridge, and has an easy climb to its top on the Garfield Ridge Trail off the Gale River Loop Road.  Mount Garfield also offers the Garfield Ridge Campsite and is covered with boulders above the Garfield Ridge Trail.

Mount Hancock:

     Located on the southern side of the Pemigewasset Wilderness Area the 4,380 foot tall Mount Hancock is found in Grafton County between the Crawford Notch and the Franconia Notch.  Mount Hancock possesses the two subpeaks known as North Hancock, that stands 4,403 feet tall, and South Hancock, that stands 4,278 feet tall.  Trails leading up Mount Hancock include the Cedar Brook Trail, the Hancock Notch Trail, and the Hancock Loop Trail.  Mount Hancock also provides several stream crossings and a gentle slope.

Mount Hitchcock:

     Found near Deerfield the 3,612 foot tall Mount Hitchcock has the distinction of being the one hundreth tallest mountain in the state of New Hampshire.

Mount Lafayette:

     An extremely popular Day-Hike location in the White Mountain National Forest, and regarded as one of New England's Fifty Finest Topographically Prominent Mountains, the 5,249 foot tall Mount Lafayette is found on the northern end of the Franconia Range.  Several trails lead to the summit of Mount Lafayette including the Greenleaf Trail from the Cannon Mountain tramway's parking lot, the Bridle Path from the Lafayette Place Campground along Interstate 93, the Garfield Ridge Trail, the Franconia Ridge Trail, the Franconia Notch Recreational Trail, the Skookumchuck Trail, and a portion of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail.  Mount Lafayette features the Franconia Notch State Park on its western side, the Greenleaf Hut that is the third highest hut in the High Huts of the White Mountains System, and it's co-fourth largest as well, and a summit that begins the western edge of the Pemigewasset Wilderness Area of the White Mountain National Forest.

Mount Liberty:

     Part of the Franconia Ridge the 4,459 foot tall Mount Liberty overlooks the Franconia Notch in the Franconia Notch State Park.  A relatively easy climb Mount Liberty possesses a huge, pointy, rocky summit and is a popular hiking destination that may be accessed by the Whitehorse Trail, the Liberty Spring Trail, the Franconia Ridge Trail, and the Flume Slide Trail.

Mount Waumbek:

     Found inside the White Mountain National Forest near Gorham the 4,006 foot tall Mount Waumbek can be easily accessed by US Route 2 from the Starr King Trail, the Cohos Trail, a 162 mile long hiking trail that connects the southern end of Coos County to its northern end, and by the Kilkenny Ridge Trail.  Mount Waumbek is also the highest elevation point in the Pliny Range and is an extremely popular Peak-Bagger hiking location for an enjoyable walk in the woods.

Mount Weeks:

     Named for United States Senator John W. Weeks of New Hampshire, who sponsored the 1911 Weeks Act that created the White Mountain National Forest, the 3,901 foot tall Mount Weeks is the northeasternmost mountain in the Pliny Range and the highest elevation point of the town of Berlin.  Viewless and heavily wooded Mount Weeks is considered on the list of the One Hundred Tallest Mountains in New England.  The Weeks State Park and Mansion home of John W. Weeks can also be found in the area.

Mount Willard:

     Found near Whitefield, in the middle of Crawford Notch, the 2,865 foot tall massive Mount Willard may be easily accessed by the Mount Willard Trail and provides popular panoramic scenes from the mountain's ledge.

Mount Willey:

     Located in Grafton County the 4,255 foot tall Mount Willey is the southernmost and second highest mountain in the Willey Range.  Mount Willey also helps establish the western wall of the Crawford Notch.  The wooded summit of Mount Willey can be found at the northeast corner of the Pemigewasset Wilderness Area just outside the Crawford Notch State Park.  Mount Willey can be accessed by the Willey Range Trail, the A-Z Trail that runs from the Avalon Trail to the Zealand Hut, the Ethan Pond Trail, the Kendron Flume Trail, and the Avalon Trail.

Mount Zealand:

     Standing on a spur ridge on the northern end of the Pemigewasset Wilderness Area the remote 4,265 foot tall Mount Zealand is crossed by the Appalachian National Scenic Trail making the mountain a popular hiking destination.  Mount Zealand's heavily wooded summit is only accessed by a nameless spur trail that comes off of the Twinway Trail with the Bondcliff Trail, the North Twin Spur Trail, the North Twin Trail, and the Zeacliff Trail all leading to the Twinway Trail.  Mount Zealand's eastern end, known as Mount Zeacliff, forms one side of Zealand Notch, and the mountain is also the home of the Zealand Hut of the High Huts of the White Mountains System.  Mount Zealand has the 25 foot tall Zealand Falls as its main attraction

Owl's Head Mountain:

     Found between Lincoln Brook and the Franconia Branch of the Pemigewasset River the 4,025 foot tall Owl's Head Mountain's viewless, densely tree-covered summit receives very few hikers compared to the rest of the White Mountains.  Owl's Head Mountain is famously remote due to being blocked off from US Route 302, US Route 3, Interstate 93, and the Kancamagus Scenic Byway by the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River, the Franconia Ridge, the Garfield Ridge, the Twin Mountain Range, and the Willey Mountain Range.  Owl's Head Mountain does, however, provide panoramic scenes from the Owl's Head Slide area and has several stream crossings.  Owl's Head Mountain also lacks any maintained trails.

The Bulge:

     Part of the Pilot Range the 3,940 foot tall heavily wooded mountain known as The Bulge, that possesses a viewless summit, is on the Appalachian Mountain Club's list of One Hundred Highest Peaks in the Northeastern United States.

The Horn:

     Located on the Pilot Range's southwestern section the 3,904 foot tall mountain known as The Horn, near Unknown Pond, a scenic remote lake in Coos County, is a popular Day-Hike location.

Wildcat Mountain:

     Part of the Carter-Moriah Range the 4,427 foot tall Wildcat Mountain sits on the eastern side of Pinkham Notch facing Carter Dome.  Wildcat Mountain possesses five summits known as A, B, C, D, and E that are all at least 4,000 feet tall, however, only A and D are designated as New Hampshire Four-Thousand Footers because B, C, and E all lack the topographical prominence for this consideration.  Wildcat Mountain provides the Wildcat Mountain Ski Area, regarded as one of the most popular alpine ski resorts in New England, that contains the three mile long Polecat Trail, the longest ski trail in New Hampshire.  Wildcat Mountain is famous for its spectacular panoramic scenes of the Presidential Mountains, Huntington Ravine, and Tuckerman Ravine.  The Atlantic Ocean, and Sebago Lake, the deepest and second largest lake in the state of Maine, can also be seen from Wildcat Mountain.  Trails that lead up Wildcat Mountain include the Polecat Trail, the Wildcat Ridge Trail, the Nineteen Mile Brook Trail, the Lost Pond Trail, and a section of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail that crosses the summit of the mountain.

Baldface-Royce Mountain Range:

     Found on the state line between New Hampshire and Maine, and consisting of several mountains that all stand less than 4,000 feet tall, the Baldface-Royce Mountain Range is bordered by the Cold River, Evans Brook, Evans Notch, the Wild River, Perkins Notch, the East Branch of the Saco River, Mountain Pond, and Mount Kearsarge North.  The Baldface-Royce Mountain Range contains the 3,610 foot tall North Baldface Mountain, the 3,570 foot tall South Baldface Mountain, the 2,167 foot tall Mount Hastings, the 3,114 foot tall East Royce Mountain, the 3,210 foot tall West Royce Mountain, the 2,462 foot tall Ragged Jacket Mountain, the 2,782 foot tall Mount Meader, the 3,030 foot tall Eagle Crag Mountain, the 3,000 foot tall Baldface Knob on the southern end of the Baldface-Royce Mountain Range's alpine zone, the 2,939 foot tall Eastman Mountain, the 3,335 foot tall Chandler Mountain, the 2,181 foot tall Round Mountain, and the 2,005 foot tall Slope Mountain, all of which are found in the White Mountain National Forest.  Trails provided by the Baldface-Royce Mountain Range include the Baldface Circle Trail, the Slippery Brook Trail, the Eastman Mountain Trail, the Meader Ridge Trail, the Baldface Knob Trail, the Basin Rim Trail, the Royce Connector Trail, the East Royce Trail, the Laughing Lion Trail, the Royce Trail, the Basin Trail, the Mount Meader Trail, the Bicknell Ridge Trail, the Burnt Mill Brook Trail, the Black Angel Trail, and the Eagle Link Trail.

Cannon-Kinsman Mountain Range:

     Found in Grafton County North and South Kinsman Mountains are connected to Cannon Mountain by The Cannon Balls Ridge.  North Kinsman Mountain provides a viewless summit, however, a short bushwhack east of that point allows visitors panoramic scenes of South Kinsman Mountain, Cannon Mountain, the Franconia Ridge, and the 12 acre Lonesome Lake in the Franconia Notch State Park that is famous for the Flume Gorge, the historical Old Man of the Mountain Site, Eagle Cliffs, the Old Man's Foot rock formation, The Basin granite pothole, and as the home of the Cannon Mountain Ski Resort.

Carter-Moriah Mountain Range:

     Forming the northeastern side of the isolated Pinkham Notch mountain pass, and glacially U-shaped valley that is surrounded by Wildcat Mountain, the Presidential Mountains, and the Carter-Moriah Mountain Range, and housing a variety of rare ecosystems, famously rugged terrain, a Northern hardwood forest, a softwood forest, a balsam fir forest, alpine-Artic vegetation above its timberline, Nordic skiing on the Great Glen Trails, and popular backcountry skiing at Tuckerman Ravine, the Carter-Moriah Mountain Range consists of the 4,832 foot tall Carter Dome that possesses the Black Angel Trail, the Carter Dome Trail, and the Nineteen Mile Brook Trail, the 4,675 foot tall Mount Hight with its bald summit and panoramic views, the 4,420 foot tall South Carter Mountain, the 4,600 foot tall Middle Carter Mountain, the 4,530 foot tall North Carter Mountain, the 4,049 foot tall Mount Moriah, the 3,755 foot tall Middle Moriah Mountain, the 3,720 foot tall Imp Mountain, and the 3,735 foot tall Shelbourne Moriah Mountain that is the northernmost Carter-Moriah Mountain Range summit on the Appalachian National Scenic Trail.  Other notable features of the Carter-Moriah Mountain Range include the two Carter Lakes, The Ramparts Boulder Field, Carter Notch that is only accessible by hiking trails, and the Carter Notch Hut that is the third lowest in altitude, third lowest capacity, oldest hut, and easternmost hut in the High Huts of the White Mountains System.

Dartmouth Mountain Range:

     Found in the Low and Burbank's Grant township of Coos County the Dartmouth Mountain Range is a wooded ridge that travels east to west from Jefferson Notch in the Presidential Mountains to the town of Carroll, and overlooks the 1900 to 1902-built National Historic Landmark known as the Mount Washington Hotel and Resort, as well as Bretton Woods, and its famous Bretton Woods Mountain Resort Ski Area, that has the largest downhill ski resort in the state of New Hampshire and more than 100 ski trails.  The Dartmouth Mountain Range consists of the 3,661 foot tall Mount Deception, the 3,727 foot tall Mount Dartmouth, the highest elevation point in the Dartmouth Mountain Range, the 3,373 foot tall Millen Hill, and the 3,058 foot tall Mount Mitten that is just off the main ridge of the Dartmouth Mountain Range.

Dartmouth-Sunapee Region:

     Bordering the White Mountains, the Lakes Region, the state of Vermont, and the world famous Monadnock Region that includes the 3,165 foot tall Mount Monadnock, and its bare, isolated, and rocky summit that is the most prominent mountain between the White Mountains and the Berkshire Mountains in Massachusetts, and was made famous by the writings of Henry David Thoreau, who is best known for his book called Walden about living in natural surroundings, and for his essay entitled Civil Disobedience that argued about individual resistence to civil government in moral opposition to an unjust state, as well as by the writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, who was known as the Concord Sage, and led the Transcendentalist Movement of the mid-19th Century, and wrote many poems and several essays about such topics as freedom and individuality, the Dartmouth-Sunapee Region contains four mountains that are all shorter than 3,200 feet tall including the 2,700 foot tall Croydon Peak that can not be legally climbed because it is owned by a private hunting club, the 3,156 foot tall Mount Cardigan that possesses several trails leading up the mountain including the Holt Trail and the West Ridge Trail, the 2,937 foot tall Mount Kearsarge, and the 2,780 foot tall Mount Sunapee that features the famously popular Lake Solitude as well as the Andrews Brook Trail.

Franconia Mountain Range:

     The second tallest range of mountain peaks in the White Mountains the Franconia Mountain Range, with the Franconia Ridge that connects all the peaks together, contains the third largest alpine tundra area in the United States east of the Rocky Mountains, an area that extends from Little Haystack Mountain's summit to north of Mount Lafayette, as well as the Pemigewasset Wilderness Area, in the White Mountain National Forest, that includes Mount Zealand, Mount Hancock, the Twin Mountain Range, and the Franconia Mountain Range, but not their summits.  The Pemigewasset Wilderness Area also provides an extensive network of various trails, with the approximately nine mile long, very rugged and scenic Franconia Ridge Loop Trail, that includes the Greenleaf Trail, the Old Bridle Path, the Falling Waters Trail, and a section of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, one of its favorite trails.  The Franconia Mountain Range also displays the 5,249 foot tall Mount Lafayette on its northern end that is one of the most famous Day-Hike locations in the White Mountain National Forest, the 4,800 foot tall Little Haystack Mountain, the 4,459 foot tall Mount Liberty, the 4,328 foot tall Mount Flume with its extremely steep Flume Slide Trail, the 5,084 foot tall Mount Lincoln, and the 5,000 foot tall Mount Truman.

Mahoosuc Mountain Range:

     Standing along the New Hampshire and Maine state line, near Gorham, the Mahoosuc Mountain Range, a northern extension of the White Mountains, features the 4,180 foot tall Old Speck Mountain, the fourth highest mountain in the Black Bear state, as well as the tallest mountain in the Mahoosuc Range.  A large section of the Mahoosuc Mountain Range belongs to Grafton Notch State Park in Maine, and to the National Park Service's Appalachian National Scenic Trail, an area that is wellknown as one of the hardest portions of the Trail to hike especially between the 3,450 foot tall Fulling Mill Mountain and the 3,490 foot tall Mahoosuc Mountain.  Other mountains found in the Mahoosuc Mountain Range include the 3,790 foot tall Mahoosuc Arm, the 3,870 foot tall West Peak of Goose Eye Mountain, the 3,650 foot tall North Peak of Goose Eye Mountain, the 3,794 foot tall East Peak of Goose Eye Mountain, the 3,565 foot tall Mount Carlo, the 2,893 foot tall North Baldcap Mountain, the 3,565 foot tall Mount Success, the 3,065 foot tall Bald Cap Mountain, the 2,785 foot tall Bald Cap Peak, the 2,631 foot tall Cascade Mountain, and the 2,555 foot tall Mount Hayes.  Remotely located the rugged Mahoosuc Mountain Range is bordered by Grafton Notch and the Androscoggin River.  The Mahoosuc Mountain Range receives very limited tourist traffic, produces several trailless peaks, and possesses many large bodies of water including Speck Pond, Gentian Pond, Page Pond, Success Pond, and Dream Lake.  Trails found in the Mahoosuc Mountain Range include the Peabody Trail, the Austin Brook Trail, the Centenial Trail, the Mahoosuc Notch Trail, Success Pond Road, and a portion of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, that also passes through Mahoosuc Notch, considered the most difficult mile of the approximately 2,200 mile long Trail from Springer Mountain, Georgia, the Trail's southern terminus, to Mount Katahdin, Maine, it's northern ending point.

Sandwich Mountain Range:

     Located between the Lakes Region and the Kancamagus Scenic Byway the extremely rugged and panoramic Sandwich Mountain Range features the 4,170 foot tall Mount Tripyramid, and its three distinct peaks that include The Fool Killer peak and the Scaur peak, and is flanked by the two The Sleepers peaks.  Other summits contained in the Sandwich Mountain Range include the 3,490 foot tall Mount Chocorua that is also the easternmost Sandwich Mountain Range peak, and a very popular hiking location especially on the Champney Falls Trail, the Piper Trail, and the Liberty Trail.  The Sandwich Mountain Range also provides the 4,043 foot tall Mount Passaconaway, in the Sandwich Mountain Range Wilderness of the White Mountain National Forest, on the eastern edge of the Waterville Valley that is wellknown for its Winter skiing, and thickly wooded summit, that may be accessed from the Wonalancet trails or the Kancamagus Scenic Byway trails, the 4,020 fot tall Mount Whiteface, that is near the unlogged amphitheater-like valley head known as The Bowl, with a summit that is reachable from the Rollins Trail, and contains the massive granite cliff Mount Whiteface is named for, the 4,003 foot tall Mount Tecumseh that remains the site of the Waterville Valley Ski Resort and is the lowest "4,000 Footer" on the Appalachain Mountain Club's list of Four-Thousand Footers in New Hampshire, the 3,993 foot tall Sandwich Mountain, found between Grafton and Carroll Counties, that has many hiking trails, the 3,198 foot tall Mount Paugus, and the 3,763 foot tall Mount Kancamagus.

Twin Mountain Range:

     Uniquely configured into the shape of a cross, with its northern axis found in North Twin, and its east-west portion between Mount Garfield and Mount Zeacliff, the Twin Range provides easy access to the Ammonoosuc River Valley and the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River Valley, as well as Zealand Notch between Whitewall Mountain and Zeacliff Peak.  The Twin Range also provides above-treeline hiking, a portion of the Pemigewasset Loop Trail, and a section of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail.  Notable mountains possessed by the Twin Range include the 4,580 foot tall Mount Guyot on the northern boundary of the Pemigewasset Wilderness Area in the White Mountain National Forest, the 4,698 foot tall Mount Bond at the southernmost point of the Twin Range, the 4,495 foot tall Mount Garfield, the 4,265 foot tall Mount Zealand, the 4,055 foot tall Mount Hale with the Zealand Falls Hut, that is considered a "family hut," and is the lowest capacity hut in the High Huts of the White Mountains System, the 4,760 foot tall North Twin Mountain, and the 4,902 foot tall South Twin Mountain with its extremely rocky summit.

Willey Mountain Range:

     Situated on the western side of Crawford Notch, at the foot of the Presidential Mountains, in the White Mountain National Forest's largest enclave, the extremely popular Willey Mountain Range provides the 4,052 foot tall Mount Tom, the 4,331 foot tall Mount Field, the 4,255 foot tall Mount Willey, and the 2,865 foot tall Mount Willard.  The Willey Mountain Range also contains the Rosebrook Mountains Northern Extension of the Willey Mountain Range that possesses the 3,004 foot tall Mount Rosebrook, the 2,748 foot tall Mount Oscar, the 3,043 foot tall Mount Stickney, and Mount Echo, as well as Ethan Pond, that is generally considered the southern end of the Willey Mountain Range.  Trails that lead up the Willey Mountain Range include the Kendron Flume Trail, the Avalon Trail, the Mount Tom Spur Trail, the Willey Range Trail, the Mount Willard Trail, the A-Z Trail, the Ethan Pond Trail, and a portion of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

Kancamagus Scenic Byway:

     The Kancamagus Scenic Byway, a twenty-six and a half mile long two lane road between Lincoln and Conway, that follows the Swift River and the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River, contains popular sites at the Rocky Gorge on the Swift River, the covered bridge at Albany, and the Swift River Lower Falls.  One of the most scenic drives in the White Mountains the Kancamagus Scenic Byway is also full of visitors every October enjoying the Fall foliage found along the route.

Old Man of the Mountains:

     The Old Man of the Mountains, a series of five granite cliff ledges on Cannon Mountain that formed a northerly view, and appeared to be the profile of a face when viewed together, was one of the most popular attractions of the White Mountains, but collasped in 2003.  The Old Man of the Mountains remains the State Symbol of New Hampshire.

State Parks:

     The White Mountains feature eight New Hampshire State Parks including the Bedell Bridge State Park, a 38 acre area found along the Connecticut River in the town of Haverhill, the 5,775 acre Crawford Notch State Park in Harts Location that is full of hiking trails, wildlife, waterfalls, the Dry River Campground, and the historic Willey House, the Echo Lake State Park in Conway that possesses the famous 700 foot Cathedral Ledge, White Horse Ledge, numerous hiking trails around the Saco River Valley, and the White Mountain Hotel and Resort, the 7 acre Eisenhower Memorial Wayside Park in Carroll that pays tribute to the 34th President of the United States, the 397 acre Forest Lake State Park and Beach on the shore of Forest Lake in Dalton that was one of the first ten original State Parks created in New Hampshire in 1935, the eight mile long Franconia Notch State Park, from Lincoln to Franconia, between the Kinsman Mountain Range and the Franconia Mountain Range, with Star Attractions including the Flume Gorge, the Old Man of the Mountain Historical Site, Profile Lake, Lonesome Lake, Echo Lake, snow skiing at the massive Cannon Mountain Ski Resort, the New England Ski Museum, and Eagle Cliffs, as well as the Old Man's Foot rock formation, and the 774 acre Moose Brook State Park in Gorham that is used as a base for visitors to the White Mountains.  Moose Brook State Park also provides many popular hiking trails.

Mount Washington State Park:

     The 59 acre Mount Washington State Park includes the Mount Washington Weather Observatory, the Tip Top House hotel, the oldest surviving building on top of the mountain, that features exhibits about the history of Mount Washington, the 1852 Summit House Hotel, and the Mount Washington Cog Railway, the world's first mountain climbing railroad.

Attitash and Bear Peak Ski Area:

     Located on US Route 302 in Bartlett in the heart of the White Mountains the Attitash and Bear Peak Ski Area possesses 78 ski runs, a 1,750 foot verticle drop, 310 skiable acres, 23 miles of ski trails, an average of 155 inches of snowfall annually, a variety of terrain, a Learning Center with a Snowbelt, wider trails at Bear Peak, high speed quads known as the Flying Yankee and the Flying Bear, and a Summer alpine slide.

Black Mountain Ski Area:

     Found in Jackson the Black Mountain Ski Area provides an assortment of trails for all levels of skiers, the Upper Maple Slalom, panoramic scenes of Mount Washington in the Presidential Mountains, a family-friendly environment, the popular Lostbo Pub, 143 skiable acres, 45 ski trails, an 1,100 foot verticle drop, and easy access to the 100 foot tall Jackson Falls.

Bretton Woods Resort:

     A part of the Mount Washington Resort in Carroll the Bretton Woods Resort is the largest ski area in the state of New Hampshire.  Bretton Woods is famous as a Beginner ski area although there is plenty of room for the most advanced Expert skiers as well.  Bretton Woods features the Rosebrook Canyon, West Mountain, a Learning Center, a Children's Center, a Food and Wine Festival, a 1,500 foot verticle drop, 434 skiable acres, a single base area, and various themed weekends.

Cannon Mountain Ski Area:

     Located in the Franconia Notch State Park, along Interstate 93 between Lincoln and Franconia, the Cannon Mountain Ski Area provides 165 skiable acres, a 2,186 foot verticle drop, the largest verticle drop in New Hampshire, 55 assorted difficulty ski trails including Brookside, Tuckerbrook, Tramline, Coyote Crossing, Bear Paw, Fleitman, Deer Run, Lower Cannon, Gremlin, Parkway, Turnpike, Vista Way, Middle Cannon, Middle Ravine, Cannonball Express, Paulie's Extension, Rocket, Zoomer, Paulie's Folly, Avalanche, Skylight, and Upper Ravine.  The Cannon Mountain Ski Area also possesses the Peabody Base Area, the Brookside Learning Area, and the Kinsman Glade.

Cranmore Mountain Ski Resort:

     Found in North Conway the Cranmore Mountain Ski Resort contains a 1,200 foot verticle drop, 200 skiable acres, 54 ski trails for all levels of skiers, an average annual snowfall of about 120 inches a year, and operates as the Cranmore Mountain Adventure Park in the Summer that features the Legends Cafeteria and the Soaring Eagle Zipline.

King Pine Ski Area at the Purity Spring Resort:

     The small King Pine Ski Area at the Purity Spring Resort in East Madison possesses 45 skiable acres, a wellknown family-friendly atmosphere, 17 ski trails, a 350 foot verticle drop, an assortment of cross-country, backcountry, and snowshoeing trails, the Pine Meadows Snowtubing Park, the Tohko Ice Skating Dome, the Purity Spring Cross-Country and Snowshoe Reserve that leads to the New Hampshire Audubon Hoyt Wildlife Sanctuary, sleigh rides at the Burnt Meadows Stables, the spring-fed Purity Lake, and night skiing at East Slope, White Pine, West Slope, King Pine, Pine Cone, Pine Board, Knotty Pine, Pine Spills, Crooked Pine, and Scotch Pine.

Waterville Valley Resort:

     Located in the White Mountain National Forest on Mount Tecumseh the Waterville Valley Resort provides a 2,020 foot verticle drop, 52 ski trails, 46 miles of Nordic skiing, an ice arena, the "Black and Blue Trail Smashers" Ski Club, the Waterville Valley Academy Winter Sports Boarding School, and the White Mountain Athletic Club.

Wildcat Mountain Ski Area:

     One of the most popular alpine ski locations in New England the Wildcat Mountain Ski Area near Jackson, at Pinkham Notch, in the Carter-Moriah Mountain Range contains 225 skiable acres, 47 ski trails, a 2,112 foot verticle drop, the 11 mile long, ungroomed, Wildcat Valley Cross-Country Ski Trail, Polecat Trail, the longest ski trail in New Hampshire, the Wildcat Express Gondola, the ZipRider zip-line, and an average of more than 200 inches of snow annually.

High Huts of the White Mountains:

     The High Huts of the White Mountains consist of eight mountain huts, maintained approximately one day's hike apart, along the Appalachian National Scenic Trail that provide bunks for 36 to 90 people a night, as well as breakfast and dinner meals for Thru-Hikers of that fabled trail during the Summer months of June, July, August, and part of September.

Carter Notch Hut:

     Begun in 1904 as a log cabin the Carter Notch Hut is the easternmost hut in the High Huts of the White Mountains System and the oldest building as well.  The Carter Notch Hut has two bunkhouses and an extremely large boulder field nearby.  The success of the Carter Notch Hut helped establish the other huts in the High Huts System.  The Carter Notch Hut is also the third lowest hut in terms of altitude in the High Huts System and has the third lowest occupancy capacity of all the High Huts.

Galehead Hut:

     Found on the rugged Garfield Ridge the Galehead Hut, originally built in 1931, was replaced by a newer model in 2000, and is the co-fourth highest hut.  The Galehead Hut also has the second lowest occupancy capacity of all the High Huts.

Greenleaf Hut:

     The Greenleaf Hut on Mount Lafayette was originally built in 1930 and provides panoramic scenes of the Franconia Ridge.  The Greenleaf Hut is the third highest hut in elevation in the High Huts of the White Mountains System and is also the co-fourth highest capacity hut.

Lakes of the Clouds Hut:

     Originally built in 1901, and renovated at least six times since then, the Lakes of the Clouds Hut is the most popular, largest, highest, and easily accessible hut in the High Huts of the White Mountains System.  Found adjacent to the two alpine lakes that form the Ammonoosuc River the Lake of the Clouds Hut is located just below the summit of Mount Monroe in the Presidential Mountains and can be reached by the immensely popular Mount Washington Cog Railway.

Lonesome Lake Hut:

     Lonesome Lake Hut began life as a fish camp on Lonesome Lake in 1876, and is the southernmost hut in the system, as well as an extremely popular family hut because of its easy ascent and low altitutde.  The Lonesome Lake Hut also has the fourth highest occupancy capacity of all the High Huts.

Madison Spring Hut:

     Manufactured in 1888 the Madison Spring Hut is the oldest of the High Huts, the oldest mountain hut site in the United States, and was extensively refurbished in 2011.  Regarded as the most difficult hut to access of all the High Huts, because of the elevation required to reach it, the Madison Spring Hut is the second highest hut in the High Huts of the White Mountains System and has the third largest occupancy capability.

Mizpah Spring Hut:

     The Mizpah Spring Hut is designed to withstand winds up to two hundred miles per hour and is the co-fourth highest hut in terms of elevation of all the High Huts.

Zealand Falls Hut:

     Completed in 1932, and possessing the lowest occupancy capability of the High Huts, the Zealand Falls Hut is a preferred family hut.

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